COVID-19, patients’ mental capacity and prisoners

@mbaumi via Unsplash The coronavirus pandemic has raised an abundance of issues at the intersection of law and medicine. In recent co-authored articles, Cameron Stewart, Professor of Health, Law and Ethics at the University of Sydney Law School considers some of these issues. Mental capacity assessments for COVID-19 patients: Emergency admissions and the CARD approach In this Journal of Bioethical … Continue reading COVID-19, patients’ mental capacity and prisoners

Reckless, incompetent, outrageous: rogue doctors performing cosmetic surgery still a problem in NSW

A previous post briefly reviewed the regulation of cosmetic surgery in New South Wales.  This post reviews the decision of the NSW Civil and Administrative Tribunal in Health Care Complaints Commission v Blackstock. Professional disciplinary complaints in NSW First, some background.  In NSW, professional disciplinary complaints against a medical practitioner can be made on a … Continue reading Reckless, incompetent, outrageous: rogue doctors performing cosmetic surgery still a problem in NSW

Improving safety for patients undergoing cosmetic surgery in NSW

If you've ever had work done, or thought about it, the decision of the NSW Civil and Administrative Tribunal in Health Care Complains Commission v Blackstock should send a shiver down your spine. This case is a powerful reminder of how behaviour that constitutes professional misconduct can give rise to professional sanctions, criminal liability, and … Continue reading Improving safety for patients undergoing cosmetic surgery in NSW

COVID-19, medical research governance, and public health orders

Image: Mika Baumeister Posted by Belinda Reeve on behalf of Cate Stewart The impact of coronavirus-related biomedical research and public heath laws have been considered in recent articles co-authored by Cameron Stewart, Professor of Health, Law and Ethics at the University of Sydney Law School. Science at warp speed: COVID-19 medical research governance In biomedical research focused on … Continue reading COVID-19, medical research governance, and public health orders

Freedom to protest, public health, and Covid-19

Update: the podcast of the event described below is now available, click here. Recently, a number of protests have taken place on the grounds of The University of Sydney against Commonwealth government education policies.  See, for example, here (28 August) and here (14 October). During the latter protest, police were filmed throwing a demonstrator heavily onto … Continue reading Freedom to protest, public health, and Covid-19

Four things to think about before starting a PhD

Image credit: Green chameleon on Unsplash Everyone’s thoughts are turning towards 2022, and hopefully, how much better it’ll be than the cluster truck that was 2021. For you, thinking about 2022 could mean considering whether or not to start postgraduate studies, and more specifically, a PhD. This is a big call. A life-changing event, in … Continue reading Four things to think about before starting a PhD

Rule of law in the Covid-19 response

The International Development Law Organisation (IDLO) has released a short publication that highlights the role of law in governments' response to Covid-19.  See here. Established by international treaty in 1988, IDLO is an inter-governmental organisation devoted to upholding the rule of law.  Australia, and the United States, are among its 37 member parties, which span … Continue reading Rule of law in the Covid-19 response

Vaping: the madness of the British?

My google search engine thinks Public Health England (PHE) is a vaping organisation. “Vaping organisation UK”.  You can try it yourself. E-cigarettes lie at the centre of PHE’s tobacco control strategy, probably drawing attention and commitment away from alternative strategies for reducing smoking rates. In September 2017, PHE encouraged smokers to “stop smoking with an … Continue reading Vaping: the madness of the British?

Post Covid: alcohol and the night time economy in the Sydney CBD

Sydney's CBD has been bleak and empty the past few months, especially at night, but coronavirus restrictions in NSW are slowly easing. From 1 June, pubs, clubs, cafes and restaurants can seat up to 50 customers (instead of the previous 10), provided businesses ensure social distancing of one person per 4 square metres, and no … Continue reading Post Covid: alcohol and the night time economy in the Sydney CBD

ABC v St George’s Healthcare NHS Trust: a new duty at the intersection of healthcare confidentiality and harm to others

  The duty of confidentiality is crucial to building relationships of trust and confidence between patients and healthcare professionals, and to effective  healthcare systems more broadly. However, the law recognises that the duty of confidentiality is not absolute and sometimes needs to yield to other public interests. A recent UK case, ABC v St George’s … Continue reading ABC v St George’s Healthcare NHS Trust: a new duty at the intersection of healthcare confidentiality and harm to others