We need to separate the neuroscience hype from the reality

This article by Sascha Callaghan and Allan McCay,  was published in the Sydney Morning Herald, 30 November 2015. Oregon serial killer Dayton Leroy Rogers was recently sentenced to death for the fourth time, after a strongly argued case that the sentence should be reduced to life in prison. Rogers' lawyer argued that scans indicated damage to … Continue reading We need to separate the neuroscience hype from the reality

Policing parenting: is the Family Court going to punish you for having a drink?

Sascha Callaghan, University of Sydney News outlets have pounced on a Family Court “order” for parents of a six-year-old boy to not smoke around the child and to limit their alcohol consumption while caring for him. Readers commented that the case represents an unacceptable “intervention by the courts into the personal space of the individual”, … Continue reading Policing parenting: is the Family Court going to punish you for having a drink?

The Sydney Neurolaw Project

The Sydney Neurolaw Project based at Sydney Law School, has finished work on a  detailed “neurolaw” reader and case law resource.  The resource maps the terrain of the emerging field of neurolaw, providing a guide to current practical questions in law that are directly affected by developments in neuroscience research.  We are also developing a … Continue reading The Sydney Neurolaw Project

Neuroscience in Australian Courtrooms: Responsibility, Liability and the Capacity to Punish

On the 25 June, we hosted the first Sydney Neurolaw Workshop:  Neuroscience in Australian Courtrooms: Responsibility, Liability and the Capacity to Punish at Sydney Law School.   The event focused on how new understandings of the brain and mind from the developing neurosciences, impact legal concepts such as responsibility and capacity, discrimination law, and even the … Continue reading Neuroscience in Australian Courtrooms: Responsibility, Liability and the Capacity to Punish